Male Drow Warrior

Male Drow Warrior ©2012 Jeffrey Boyd Garrison

Original ACEO (2.5″ x 3.5″ format) art entitled “Male Drow Warrior” was completed in 2012 mostly using cheap colored pencils… and is mostly just bad. Sooo bad, but, that’s its charm right? This actually sold on eBay way back when as I recall… probably not for more than the cost of postage to send it out though, ha!

Still, 1,000 years from now, this will be considered a priceless lost artifact, you just wait.

Token Ownership

This art piece has been “tokenized” (minted on the Ethereum blockchain by OpenSea) as an ERC-721 Ethereum token entitled Male Drow Warrior.

Ownership of this unique single edition token grants the owner the (non-exclusive) permissions to display and use the associated full resolution image (the one on this webpage) for personal non-commercial display (such as uploading to personal social media, personal blog page and in an online or virtual gallery such as are commonly found in the Cryptovoxels app).

Selling the token effectively transfers these granted permissions (although previously posted digital displays may remain posted and need not be taken down or removed post transfer).

The token owner may edit the referenced art image (by cropping, re-sizing, changing the image format from JPEG to something else like PNG, change resolution, reduce file size, etc.) for the purpose of facilitating convenient display. The image may not be altered so as to change it to a newly distinct or derivative artwork without express permission by the artist. Similarly, it may also not be used for commercial purposes (other than to expedite sale of the token to a new owner).

Finally, the referenced image may be used (whole or edited as mentioned above) by the token owner as an online avatar, badge, wallpaper or background on webpages, social media and in virtual reality environments.

All rights to the digital art are also reserved by the artist.

Beholding Girl

Beholding Girl ©2011 Jeffrey Boyd Garrison

Original ACEO (2.5″ x 3.5″ format) art entitled “Beholding Girl” was completed in 2012 mostly using cheap marker pens. I think I was just trying to quickly spill the odds and ends of my imagination into an illustration at the time and this happened.

Token Ownership

This art piece has been “tokenized” (minted on the Ethereum blockchain by OpenSea) as an ERC-721 Ethereum token entitled Beholding Girl.

Ownership of this unique single edition token grants the owner the (non-exclusive) permissions to display and use the associated full resolution image (the one on this webpage) for personal non-commercial display (such as uploading to personal social media, personal blog page and in an online or virtual gallery such as are commonly found in the Cryptovoxels app).

Selling the token effectively transfers these granted permissions (although previously posted digital displays may remain posted and need not be taken down or removed post transfer).

The token owner may edit the referenced art image (by cropping, re-sizing, changing the image format from JPEG to something else like PNG, change resolution, reduce file size, etc.) for the purpose of facilitating convenient display. The image may not be altered so as to change it to a newly distinct or derivative artwork without express permission by the artist. Similarly, it may also not be used for commercial purposes (other than to expedite sale of the token to a new owner).

Finally, the referenced image may be used (whole or edited as mentioned above) by the token owner as an online avatar, badge, wallpaper or background on webpages, social media and in virtual reality environments.

All rights to the digital art are also reserved by the artist.

Odinic Blend Bright

Odinic Blend Bright ©2019 Jeffrey Boyd Garrison

This is a 2019 digital edit (using GIMP software) of my original Odinic Blend hand illustrated ACEO card drawn in 2011.

Token Ownership

This art piece has been “tokenized” (minted on the Ethereum blockchain by OpenSea) as an ERC-721 Ethereum token entitled Odinic Blend Bright.

Ownership of this unique single edition token grants the owner the (non-exclusive) permissions to display and use the associated full resolution image (the one on this webpage) for personal non-commercial display (such as uploading to personal social media, personal blog page and in an online or virtual gallery such as are commonly found in the Cryptovoxels app).

Selling the token effectively transfers these granted permissions (although previously posted digital displays may remain posted and need not be taken down or removed post transfer).

The token owner may edit the referenced art image (by cropping, re-sizing, changing the image format from JPEG to something else like PNG, change resolution, reduce file size, etc.) for the purpose of facilitating convenient display. The image may not be altered so as to change it to a newly distinct or derivative artwork without express permission by the artist. Similarly, it may also not be used for commercial purposes (other than to expedite sale of the token to a new owner).

Finally, the referenced image may be used (whole or edited as mentioned above) by the token owner as an online avatar, badge, wallpaper or background on webpages, social media and in virtual reality environments.

All rights to the digital art are also reserved by the artist.

Odinic Blend

Odinic Blend ©2011 Jeffrey Boyd Garrison

Original ACEO (2.5″ x 3.5″ format) art entitled “Odinic Blend” was completed in 2011 at the Chalet diner on City of Spokane’s South Hill while drinking coffee and relaxing. This was my first ever ACEO art and it was mostly done with inexpensive colored marker pens.

The subject matter was vaguely inspired by a dream I had while still in the Army and stationed up at Ft. Wainwright, Alaska roundabouts 1995.

Token Ownership

This art piece has been “tokenized” (minted on the Ethereum blockchain by OpenSea) as an ERC-721 Ethereum token entitled Odinic Blend.

Ownership of this unique single edition token grants the owner the (non-exclusive) permissions to display and use the associated full resolution image (the one on this webpage) for personal non-commercial display (such as uploading to personal social media, personal blog page and in an online or virtual gallery such as are commonly found in the Cryptovoxels app).

Selling the token effectively transfers these granted permissions (although previously posted digital displays may remain posted and need not be taken down or removed post transfer).

The token owner may edit the referenced art image (by cropping, re-sizing, changing the image format from JPEG to something else like PNG, change resolution, reduce file size, etc.) for the purpose of facilitating convenient display. The image may not be altered so as to change it to a newly distinct or derivative artwork without express permission by the artist. Similarly, it may also not be used for commercial purposes (other than to expedite sale of the token to a new owner).

Finally, the referenced image may be used (whole or edited as mentioned above) by the token owner as an online avatar, badge, wallpaper or background on webpages, social media and in virtual reality environments.

All rights to the digital art are also reserved by the artist.

Odinic Blend Old & Bright

Odinic Blend Old & Bright Digital Art Image
Odinic Blend Old & Bright ©2019 Jeffrey Boyd Garrison

I created this (with the assistance of GIMP software) by combining the original (2011) version of hand illustrated “Odinic Blend” ACEO with the new (2019) “Bright” digital edit of that same piece… altered even further by putting more blue color into the digital edit.

The overall effect of this animation further captures the original inspiration I had while having coffee and doodling at the Chalet diner on the city of Spokane’s South Hill back in 2011. It was my very first ACEO art and therefore has also become my very first digital animation.

Token Ownership

This art piece has been “tokenized” (minted on the Ethereum blockchain by OpenSea) as an ERC-721 Ethereum token entitled Odinic Blend Old & Bright.

Ownership of this unique single edition token grants the owner the (non-exclusive) permissions to display and use the associated full resolution animation image (the one on this webpage) for personal non-commercial display (such as uploading to personal social media, personal blog page and in a virtual gallery (such as are commonly found in the Cryptovoxels app).

Selling the token effectively transfers these granted permissions. All rights to the digital art are also reserved by the artist.

The token owner may edit the referenced art image (by cropping, re-sizing, changing the image format from GIF to something else like JPEG, change resolution, lower file size, etc.) for the purpose of facilitating convenient display (this includes freezing the animation to one of the frames that make up the animation for a still image). The image may not be altered so as to change it to a newly distinct or derivative artwork without express permission by the artist. Similarly, it may also not be used for commercial purposes (other than to expedite sale of the token to a new owner).

Although attribution to the artist (me) is not required in any display, no misrepresentation of the artist or art is permitted. Simply put, you don’t have to tag my name, but don’t make it look like someone else made this art and I’m happy.

Don’t hesitate to shoot me any questions about these specifics; I’m glad to answer questions.

Knights of the Hart of Highfolk Tactical Ponderings

Again, looking at the 1983 World of Greyhawk Glossography’s encounters and specifically at the “Elves, Knights” description, I have long been presented with the idle problem of framing their presentation on a (tabletop) battlefield and/or in a D&D-esque tactical situation. My motive is in regard specifically to miniatures wargaming in the setting, but it would be useful knowledge regardless.

After some contemplation and a bit of brainstorming, I think I’ve got a perspective that might be worth sharing.

Encounter Strength

Let’s start with what the encounter description gives us in brief (referencing the contemporary AD&D stats of the source, skip this if AD&D is unfamiliar), a contingent totaling from 37-174 members as follows:

7-10 Knights
1 Commander: Elven* F/C 7/7 – AC 3; shield, lance, long sword and mace and mounted on barded medium warhorse.
1 Lieutenant: Elven* F/C 6/6 – AC 3; shield, lance, long sword and mace and mounted on barded medium warhorse.
5-8 (1d4+4) Knights: Elven* F/C, 5/5 – AC 3; shield, lance, long sword and mace and mounted on barded medium warhorse.

2-4 Magic-Users
1 Master: Elven* F/MU, 4-6/8-11 – AC 5; long sword, bow (8-11 magic +1 Arrows) and I assume to be mounted on unbarded medium warhorse (source doesn’t specify).
1-3 Assistants: Elven* F/MU, 3-5/4-7 – AC 5; long sword, bow (4-7 magic +1 Arrows) and I assume to be mounted on unbarded medium warhorse (source doesn’t specify).

Each Knight’s Entourage
1-4 Esquires: Elven* F/C, 3-4/3-4 – AC 4; shield, lance, long sword, mace and mounted on medium warhorses
3-12 (3d4) Serjeants: Elven* F2 – AC 5; bow (2 magic +1 Arrows), long sword, mace and mounted on light warhorses.

*According to the source the knights include both elves and half-elves though I am left to speculate on the ratio. I would further extrapolate that these are generally of high elven stock.

Battlefield Roles

This encounter consists of two basic roles, shock and skirmish. The first group consists of the lance armed knights and esquires while the second group are the bow armed (and shieldless) serjeants. The overall theme of the combined group emphasizes mobility since there are no heavy mounts and armor is somewhat lighter overall than contemporary human knight contingents. The team of magic-using elves can generally be categorized with the skirmish element.

Formations

The first formation I would consider would be the entire contingent assembled in line of battle per the following diagram.

Front Rank
The front rank here consists of knights and esquires starting with a knight on the extreme right and esquires under his charge immediately filling in to his left, then the next knight and his subordinate esquires, repeating on down the line.
Additional Ranks
The second, third and any following ranks are the serjeants which, falling in behind knights and squires, never extend farther to the left than the front rank.
Leaders
The Lieutenant and Commander will each be positioned either in front or behind the battle line per the Commander’s discretion. If the formation is to maneuver in line, one of the two will be out front of the first rank in the center guiding it’s movement while the other will be to the rear and normally flanked by the master magic-user. Any assistant magic-users will be positioned either rear center as a reserve or to the flank corners of the rearmost rank (serjeants will adjust left to give a space for the assistant magic-user on rear right corner).

Here’s the skinny on this. A battle line is primarily a charging attack formation. The armored and lance thick front rank is meant to move toward the enemy and when within proximity, charge at a cantor or full gallop with lowered lances. Prior to closing and while still moving at a walk or trot, the rear ranks of bow-armed serjeants can fire overhead (if the range is long enough or if the target is on a different elevation and thus the front rank can be safely fired over) to disorder/disrupt the opposing line before closing distance.

A final note on the battle line is that it can be easily entered into from and exited out of to a column of march four files wide. To change from line, the leaders may move to the extreme right (which becomes the head of the formation) with the Magic-users immediately behind to the right and/or behind them (1st and 2nd ranks of the file). Of course, the stationing of these leaders is always variable.

To Be Continued…

High Elven Mounted Serjeant of the Knights of the Hart of Highfolk c. 576 C.Y.

High Elven Mounted Serjeant of the Knights of the Hart of Highfolk c. 576CY

So, I’ve long looked at the encounter tables in the 1983 World of Greyhawk Glossography and wanted to do some reasonable illustrations (I’ve done plenty of derpy sketches over the years but nothing I’d probably want to blog about individually).

I decided to do an elven “serjeant” (2nd level Fighter) of the Knights of the Hart of Highfolk… and I chose to do it in GIMP …with a mouse (no tablet).

Please allow me to share with you some process photos.

First there were the rough sketches to get an idea of what I wanted, regular cheapo mechanical pencil (Bic) on regular low budget printer paper.

I took that scanned JPEG image (using Epson V39 portable-ish scanner) and imported it into GIMP v2.8.22 (freeware). I picked one of the sketches on there that looked painfully much like a cringeworthy My Little Pony tribute, cropped it and got to work inking it with some thick-ish teal lines. I failed to notice that I forgot to ink in the horse’s ears.

Hart of Highfolk Serjeant WIP #1

So then, when I was happy with the (still ear-less horse) line work, I added my color layer and began to splash around some paint. Still no ears!

Hart of Highfolk Serjeant WIP #2

Painting was done and ears were finally added. Line-work was then changed to black in preparation for the next stage (I was making up as I went)… which was shading.

Hart of Highfolk Serjeant WIP #3

So there’s the shading all done. Last was to do highlighting, groundshadow, and a shameless (and an unglamerously weak) signature/tag/initial.

High Elven Mounted Serjeant of the Knights of the Hart of Highfolk c. 576CY

At this point I’m wondering whether I should attempt to turn this guy into a printable paper miniature cutout, a virtual tabletop token, or some other kind of resource image asset. What do you think?

I hope you enjoyed sharing in the madness/methodology behind this particular project. Cheers until next time!

Everything You Need to Know About Rights

Rights are not entitlements. Their benefits are EARNED by their exercise.

Rights are actions saying, “I can and will do this, and will (PERSONALLY) defend against anyone who, through use of force, would seek to stop me.” A true RIGHT is a personal will to action, not a privilege granted by some external authority or afforded by some collective. We exercise a RIGHT because INDIVIDUALLY it IS right. It’s inarguable and self-evident, not a perk or a gift for good behavior.

Exercising a right doesn’t ask permission… it is an act which is the most sovereign and answers to no higher authority. Only sovereign entities …like Kings, have rights. All power comes from that sovereignty. If you have to ask permission, then you are not exercising your own authority. You either have sovereign authority over yourself, or you are a slave and at best retain “granted privileges” which are revocable. To prove your rights, you MUST demonstrate your authority by exercising them …and if need be, by defending them.

Social Labels

There seems to be an extreme polarization of social identity in the USA; on one end is the “liberal democrat” and on the other is “conservative republican.” This isn’t new news, but I want to humbly point out that I personally find it to be a hindrance overall to our progress as individuals and as a nation.

I think that the fault in identifying with these catchall labels is that it sublimates one’s own experience, judgement and wisdom to a common denominator which is necessarily amorphous and blunted. It’s unfortunate that this appears the only effective way to accommodate otherwise diverse groups because validity of issues becomes lost to perpetuation of identity. If one were previously in pursuit of truth, more often the larger group personality redirects that effort toward the less noble objective of “being right.” Unlike truth, being right REQUIRES that someone or something else be wrong and more often serves to exclude than synthesize.

All of this having been said, when it’s convenient there are sometimes advantages in donating one’s own will to a shared cause, so long as that cause is guided by enlightened benevolence. It is difficult to stand alone and none of us may do it for long but, it’s nice to step away from our chosen herd and gain perspective occasionally.